Mama eats plants

Originally Published on MamaEatsPlants.com  on April 5, 2018 By A.

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trash free, plant based lifestyle

manicotti + simple marinara

When I saw gluten free manicotti shells at my co-op, I knew I had to take them home with me! The ones I used are these ones by Jovial Foods. The box is recyclable and the plastic looking window is certified home compostable wood pulp! Plus, they taste amazing- they’re my hands down favorite brand of gluten free pasta- they cook al dente without gummy texture or off flavors.

To fill them, I knew I wanted something creamy (which is where I usually turn to cashews) but I needed to cut it with something to make it less heavy and more nutritionally dense. I remembered a lasagna recipe in one of my favorite cookbooks, Vegan For Everybody, which uses cooked cauliflower blended with the cashews to add bulk and creaminess without getting too heavy. I wasn’t sure if it would taste just right stuffed in the manicotti- I haven’t had these since going vegan- and sometimes Italian recipes which rely heavily on gluten and animal products can be hard to replicate well. To my delight, the texture and taste was perfect, gluten free, vegan and all.

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So many of you asked for an exact recipe after I showed them in my Instagram story (I saved it to my highlights so you can still watch it!) that I thought I’d write it up here for you to reference back to if desired. My marinara is super basic and relies heavily on good ingredients, so search out good canned tomatoes and good olive oil. I can my own tomatoes every summer with my mom (ever since I can remember) and it’s so worth it for the rich flavor all winter long- it’s not hard but does take a full day of work. We use a pressure canner and go off the instructions in the booklet it comes with- it’s not scary or complicated at all. Often farmers will sell their “seconds”- bruised or oddly shaped tomatoes- but the case at the market to you. San Marzano store bought canned Italian tomatoes are the closest thing to the flavor of home canned.

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plant based manicotti

for the marinara:

2 x 28 oz cans whole tomatoes

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

4-6 cloves garlic, chopped

a palm of fresh oregano (about 2 tsp chopped)

chile flakes (optional)

salt to taste

whiz the tomatoes and their juice for a few seconds in a blender or crush with your hands well to break them down into small pieces.

Add the olive oil and garlic to a pan and start the heat on medium high. When the garlic starts to sizzle and become fragrant- about 30 seconds, pour in the tomatoes (don’t let the garlic burn or color, stir around if necessary) and the oregano and chile if using. Reduce to medium low and let simmer, stirring occasionally, while you make the filling.

for the ricotta filling:

8 ounces (approx 2.5 cups) cauliflower, cut into 1/2 inch pieces

1.5 cups raw cashews, chopped if whole

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

s+p

1/4 cup fresh chopped parsley or basil

Boil cauliflower and cashews in a large pot with 3 quarts of water and 2 teaspoons kosher salt until cauliflower is very soft and falls apart easily when poked with a fork, about 20 minutes. Drain mixture in colander and let cool slightly, about 5 minutes.

Process cauliflower mixture, 3 tablespoons oil, and 1/4 cup water in processor until smooth, scraping down sides of bowl as needed, about 2 minutes. Season with plenty of salt and pepper to taste. Pulse in basil or parsley for just a few seconds to combine. Mixture can be made up to 3 days ahead.

assembling:

1 box manicotti noodles or other stuffable pasta (12-15 pieces), cooked according to package directions

Preheat oven to 375 Fahrenheit.

In a baking dish, spoon some sauce to cover the bottom of the dish. Working with one manicotti at a time, use a butter knife or a pastry bag to fill each shell. I used a butter knife and packed it in half from each end. Don’t worry if theres a few blank spots. I wasn’t perfect about it but they all turned out fine after cooking. Layer the filled ones in the dish. Spread the remaining sauce over the top.

Cover dish with a lid or aluminum foil. Bake for 40 minutes. Remove from oven and plate. I sprinkled extra chopped parsley and spooned leftover cashew ricotta that I had in the fridge over the top in little dollops (this recipe) but it would be delicious on its own too; or hold back some of the filling and dollop on top.

We served it with a simple fennel citrus salad- just toss together:

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1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced

1/2 a small red onion or fresh spring onion, thinly sliced

1 orange, cara cara, or grapefruit, pith removed and fruit sliced

1/2 cup fresh whole parsley leaves

a few handfuls mixed lettuces

juice of 1/2 a lemon

generous drizzle good extra virgin olive oil

salt and fresh cracked pepper to taste

chili flakes to taste

Split Pea Milk

Originally Published on MatthewsManna.com By The mom doc

Split Pea Milk
The first time I had ever heard of this was on a Facebook group called blenderize RN. Having a teenage boy on a blenderized/pureed diet can be difficult at times. Because of his complicated GI tract and minimal oral experience, it’s hard finding things he can and will eat without slowing his digestion down. Since Matthew drinks his formula, I wanted to increase his calories and protein without adding more formula but do it in such a way as to not upset his very restricted palate. Enter “Ripple” (aka split pea milk). Since everything I blend for him is homemade, I thought I would try making it myself. I added 1 cup to his normal formula recipe and he didn’t even notice. It was so easy and inexpensive, I just had to share.

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups of cooked yellow split peas
3 1/2 cups of water
2 tsp vanilla (optional)
4 pitted dates

Directions

In a medium size sauce pan, bring 1 cup of dry yellow split peas and 4 cups of water to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes on high then reduce temperature to simmer and cook until peas are soft (about hour). Do not drain the peas before adding them to the Vitamix. Because the peas settle, you will want to sir the pot before measuring them out.
In the large Vitamix container, add ingredients in the order listed and secure lid.
Select Variable 1.
Turn machine on and increase speed to Variable 10, then High.
Blend for 1 minute or until completely smooth.
Remove milk from blender and repeat steps 2-5 with remaining peas.

Food Tip: This recipe makes a total of 10 cups of milk. Ripple is made in a factory with added oils and gums that are not in my homemade recipe. The oils and gums allow the milk to stay in solution. Even when using the Vitamix and a filtration bag, homemade milks will separate and need to be shaken before drinking or using in a recipe. They have also reduced the peas to pea protein and removed the pea flavor. If you are used to drinking the store bought Ripple, this may be a jump for you. It is thick so if you plan on drinking it, you may want to thin it out a bit. You can also run it through a filtration bag to remove more of the solids. With 75 calories per cup and 8 grams of protein, it makes an excellent addition to a blended diet. It can also easily replace cows milk in baking for those who have a dairy free diet. Milk will stay fresh in the refrigerator for about 4 days. For oral eaters, please check out my DIY Ripple Milk post. If you are already a Ripple drinker, you may want to read How Is Ripple Milk Made? before you try to make it. It will explain the difference.

Time Tip: Make the full batch and freeze extra milk in ice cube trays then store in labeled and dated freezer bags. Each cube is about 1 once making measuring a breeze.

Money Tip: One pound of dry split peas cost around 70 cents a pound at bulk food stores like Winco. Ripple milk runs about $4.99 for 48oz. Since I only used 1 cup of dried beans, I made 80oz for only 33 cents!

Recycling Mystery: Plastic Straws

Originally Published on Earth911.com on January 24, 2018 By Trey Granger
Straws

Generations of cold liquid drinkers have embraced the plastic straw as a way of limiting tooth pain, preventing mustache stains and making sure cocktails are properly stirred. But since most straws are designed to be single-use, the question needs to be asked: Are they recyclable?

Perhaps the bigger issue than how to recycle them is how to reduce their use. In the U.S., we use 500 million drinking straws each day, an average of 1.6 straws per person. As a point of reference, just over 500 million aluminum cans are consumed each day worldwide, meaning we churn through significantly more straws than cans, even though aluminum cans are the most valuable product you can recycle.

The straw recycling conundrum has gotten to a point that some municipalities are looking to either limit their use or eliminate them entirely. Seattle is in talks to ban straws this year, and California is proposing an opt-in law where they would only be provided if asked for by customers.

The Evolution of Straw Manufacturing

Believe it or not, straws have been around since 3000 B.C., when Sumerians used them to sip beer from jars. These straws were made of gold, but eventually rye grass was used, and then paper. Paper was the material of choice until the early 1960s, but plastic was found to be a more durable material, especially for new designs like bendy straws.

Today’s straws are made of polypropylene, a resin of plastic known by the number 5 in the resin identification code. Polypropylene itself is a highly recyclable plastic resin, commonly used in yogurt containers, bottle caps, toothbrushes and plastic utensils. But recyclers are usually cautious about the types of polypropylene they accept, and straws will rarely be accepted with other forms of polypropylene.

Case in point, Preserve operates the largest polypropylene recycling program in America: the Gimme 5 program. It will accept any polypropylene containers via mail or at Northeast Whole Foods locations, as well as plastic utensils, but straws are not accepted. The company even manufactures compostable paper straws to try and limit plastic waste.

At this time, Earth911 is unaware of any curbside recycling programs that accept plastic straws.

The Problem with Plastic Straw Disposal

So if you’re one of millions of Americans who is unable to recycle straws in a curbside program, you can just throw them away, right? Well, perhaps you’ve heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch currently floating off the coast of Hawaii.

Only plastics that float can be part of this plastic island, meaning plastic water bottles will likely sink (PETE resin doesn’t float), while caps and straws will float around and not biodegrade. So if you’re having lunch on the beach, it’s probably best to leave the straws at home.

Drinks straws in container in cafe

Drinks straws in container in cafe

Here are some other things to consider when it comes to straw recycling:

  • Most straws are used in a restaurant setting, and it’s unlikely you are taking the straw home with you. That means you’re relying on either the restaurant to provide a recycling solution for its straws, or your office janitorial staff if you’re bringing a soda back to work.
  • If your curbside recycling program doesn’t take straws and you include them anyway, you are creating contamination that costs cities millions of dollars per year to remove. When in doubt, leave them out.
  • Straws are small and lightweight, meaning they will take up a negligible amount of space in a landfill. Many people use this thinking to justify using and throwing them away, but the waste will definitely add up.

Reduce and Reuse Straws

Since you can’t bank on recycling them, your best bet is to reduce straw use entirely. Unless you have sensitive teeth, tell the restaurant to hold the straw when you order drinks, or leave it in the paper wrapping so it can be used by another customer.

For those who have become accustomed to straws, buy a reusable one and bring it with you when you dine. Straws can be reused infinitely, and are manufactured to be dishwasher-safe.

There’s nothing wrong with you, you’re just traumatized

pexels-photo-54379.jpegMany people think that in order to have been traumatized emotionally that you must have been through a war, killed someone, been the victim of physical or sexual abuse.  Kidnapping is another horrible event that would leave any person traumatized.

Maybe you have never been through any of those events but you can still be traumatized.  First off I am not a Dr.  So please don’t get all scientific on me right away.  But that doesn’t mean I don’t have plenty of experience with traumatic events.  Well I have been traumatized many times during my life.  Too many to really count all of the times.  And I was never in a war or killed anyone.  But I experienced traumatic events daily at work as a Peace Officer.  Not all of them were physical.  Many of them were something I read about.  Reading about crimes repeatedly can do damage to your psyche.  Your brain does not realize that it did not happen to you.  It just knows that it’s processing it.

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Let’s also just say right away that many people are in denial about their trauma.  There is a real stigma to being traumatized.  You are damaged goods, crazy, something is wrong with you etc.  These are all of the stereotypes about people who have been traumatized.

So perhaps you did not work at a prison and just have a relatively peaceful life.  But maybe someone died in your family or you lost a pet.  A relationship ends suddenly.  All of these events even though they are routine such as death, are all traumatic events.  So people have to learn how to process the grief that they have been through.

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People think it’s so easy to just leave it in the past, let it go, move on, keep going, shut up and just get over it.  Well grief doesn’t work that way.  It needs to go through a process.  You know the 5 stages of grief: denial,depression, anger, bargaining and finally acceptance.

I tell you what going through the grief process is very difficult.  You really need a strong support system and kind, loving people who will be supportive of what you are going through.  But sometimes people act out and then they don’t get help and self medicate.  They end up rude alcoholics, drug addicts, rage monsters, assholes, sex addicts and  porn addicts.  Yikes that’s a lot.

Well I do have some good news and actually it’s kind of a short cut to the healing process.  I always like to figure out the fastest way to do something.  And the easiest way to get through this is to just accept what happened.  Get to the point where you can just say yes it happened, I am sorry it happened, I accept that it happened but now it’s time to rise above that.  What is the lesson and what can I do to get better?  Also the hardest part is forgiving the person or institution that harmed you.

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Then that’s where the real work starts.  Support groups, self-reflection, counseling, crying, feeling your feelings.  Nobody wants to do it because it’s difficult.  But once you get to the other side, you’re like that wasn’t so bad.  And you get really strong.  But you must have a support system.  If you are estranged from your family, go to a church and start making positive connections with people.

Also remember, everyone is dealing with some bull shit.  So don’t think you are the only one.  You are so not alone and people want to help you.  You might have to turn off the TV and the phone.  Just reach out to someone.  A friend, pastor, cop, hospital, teacher, nurse, Dr.   Find out what is available to you and also there are a ton of resources on-line.  You don’t have to stay stuck dear one.  But you must begin the work to heal.  And I am sorry it’s not beautiful at first.  But it is so worth it.
Valerie is a Health and Wellness Coach and yoga Instructor.  She lives in Northern California with her daughter and puppy.  Learn how Valerie is coping here.

10 Best Vegan BBQ Recipes

Originally Published on www.Peta.org on By PETA

Summer’s here, and that means that you’ve got to make the most of the sunny weather. Have all your friends and family over, and show them just how delicious vegan cookin’ can be. You’ll be sure to please any crowd with the following tasty recipes:

1. Creamy Dill Potato Salad

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2. Summer Pasta Salad

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3. Grilled Vegan Chicken With ‘Honey’ Lime and Chipotle Sauce

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4. Ultimate Sriracha Veggie Burger

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5. Black Bean Veggie Burger

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6. ‘Bacon’-Wrapped Vegan Pigs in a Blanket

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7. Grilled Garlic-Herb Corn

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8. Spicy Buffalo Cauliflower ‘Wings’

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9. Raspberry-Orange Popsicles

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10. Mint Watermelonade

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Now get grillin’!

Ready to go vegan? Take the pledge today.

Spicy Buffalo Cauliflower ‘Wings’

Originally Published on Peta.org on 2010 By Ashley Palmer

Spicy Buffalo Cauliflower ‘Wings_

Looking for a healthier (and kinder) alternative to chicken wings? Try these juicy, tangy, and spicy buffalo cauliflower “wings”!

Deliciously versatile and with just enough “kick,” these bite-sized pieces of cauliflower offer an eerily similar experience to eating chicken wings. With all the flavor and none of the guilt, this is a secret-weapon recipe that every vegan cook should have in his or her kitchen.

Enjoy!

1 cup water or soy milk
1 cup flour (any kind will work—even gluten-free!)
2 tsp. garlic powder
1 head of cauliflower, chopped into pieces
1 cup buffalo or hot sauce
1 Tbsp. vegetable oil or melted vegan butter

  •  Preheat the oven to 450°F.
  • Combine the water or soy milk, flour, and garlic powder in a bowl and stir until well combined.
  • Coat the cauliflower pieces with the flour mixture and place in a shallow baking dish. Bake for 18 minutes.
    While the cauliflower is baking, combine your buffalo sauce and olive oil or margarine in a small bowl.
  • Pour the hot sauce mixture over the baked cauliflower and continue baking for an additional 5 to 8 minutes.
  • Serve alongside vegan blue cheese dressing and celery sticks.

Makes 4 servings

Chickens are arguably the most abused animals on the planet. In the United States, approximately 9 billion chickens are killed for their flesh each year, and 305 million hens are used for their eggs. The vast majority of these animals spend their lives in total confinement—from the moment they hatch until the day they are killed.

But chickens raised on factory farms each year in the U.S. never have the chance to do anything that’s natural or important to them. A baby chick on a factory farm will never be allowed contact with his or her parents, let alone be raised by them. These chickens are deprived of the chance to take dust baths, feel the warmth of the sun on their backs, breathe fresh air, roost in trees, and build nests.

Now is the perfect time to pledge to go vegan!

How To Smell Fresh the Healthy Way

pexels-photo-207518.jpegI get it that we all want to smell good.  We want to cover up any evidence that we are human and that we sweat and sometimes get stinky.  This discussion is about antiperspirants and deodorant that is sold in many drug stores across the United States and world-wide.  I do not use anti-perspirant because there are so many toxic ingredients.

So what is the first reason that I don’t like it? That is because it has aluminum in the ingredients.  Aluminum has been linked to Alzheimer’s.  So this article is not about that.  But there has been research done and I am not going to gamble on my life just so I can not sweat and also take the risk of Alzheimers.  So if you want to take that risk.  Knock yourself out.  We all have this wonderful thing called free will.  And you get to decide how you live your life and if that’s how you want to do it.  That’s your choice.  But I’m making a different decision.

The second reason is that it stops you from sweating.  What is the reason to sweat?  To rid our body of toxins. (more here on that subject).  We must be able to release this from our body and if our under arms are clogged, it can’t get out.  So where does it go?  Gee maybe to your lymph nodes which contributes to breast cancer.  So not only does it contribute to Alzheimer’s but also breast cancer.

Don’t worry dear ones you don’t have to  have to just suffer with the funk?  To be perfectly honest, I use this natural blend I came up with.  It’s actually this natural toothpaste.  I guess it has multiple uses.  I was on vacation and I had forgotten my deodorant at home so I used the toothpaste and it worked great.  I did not smell.

But I do have an actual spray on recipe, if that would make you feel better.  But I have not tried this.  The tooth paste does work but you have to try for you.wild-flowers-flowers-plant-macro-40797.jpeg

Also remember when you make your own products, you are being super eco-friendly.  Because you put it in your own jar and didn’t buy a plastic container. So you are not only saving yourself $$ big time.  But you’re saving the planet.  And that makes you a Super Hero.  And you are sticking up for yourself and refusing to use something that is harmful to your welfare.

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So before you put it all over do a little patch test.  Put a small amount on the inside of your forearm to test for a reaction.  If after a couple of hours you don’t see anything then you are golden to use it.

So here is the recipe for the spray on deodorant:

  • 4 ounces witch hazel
  • 20 drops therapeutic-grade tea tree essential oil
  • 20 drops therapeutic-grade lavender essential oil
  • 2 teaspoons organic coconut oil melted
  • glass spray bottle
  1. Boil a cup of hot water and put the hot water in a bowl.
  2. In a smaller cup or bowl (espresso mug) put the witch hazel in the bowl to warm up slightly.  Pour in glass bottle
  3. melt the coconut oil and pour in glass bottle (use a funnel)
  4. Add the essential oils, shake up and you are done.

I know it’s so much easier to just go shopping and buy it.  So there are natural alternatives to antiperspirants that you can purchase.  Here are some good suggestions for you to consider.  Just try to see the possibility of staying healthy.  You really have to be your own best advocate.  If you don’t look out for yourself, who else will do it?

If you take a shower at night, you can put it on before bed because you never know what can happen after the lights go out.

Valerie is a Health and Wellness Coach and a Yoga Instructor.  She is passionate about the environment and knowing that as you heal yourself, you heal the planet.  Valerie is a dancer and is documenting her journey.  She also is recovering from a 26 year career in law enforcement.

These DIY Machines Let Anyone Recycle Plastic Into New Products

Originally Published on FastCompany.com on October 30, 2017 By Adele Peters

These DIY Machines Let Anyone Recycle Plastic Into New Products
Precious Plastic is giving instructions on how to build a series of simple machines that will let makers turn plastic trash into new material.

One low-cost machine that shreds plastic into flakes. [Photo: Precious Plastic]

In a workshop in downtown Chang Mai, Thailand, designers turn plastic trash–mostly plastic bags they collect from the street–into marble-like coasters and tabletops. In a maker space in Lviv, Ukraine, designers use DIY equipment hacked from old industrial parts and a shopping cart to recycle plastic trash into bowls. In Seoul, designers use a mobile plastic recycling cart for education.

The majority of the 300 million tons of plastic produced every year isn’t recycled, and recycling that does happen typically happens at an industrial scale in factories using equipment that can cost tens of thousands of dollars. But a growing number of designers are using a set of open-source, easy-to-build tools to recycle plastic and manufacture new plastic products on their own.

See how it works:

“We want to make small-scale plastic recycling accessible to everyone, as this can have an exponential effect on the amount of plastic recycled–eventually reducing the demand for new virgin plastic–and educate millions of people on plastic, plastic recycling, and how to handle it before it ends up in the environment,” says Dave Hakkens, the Dutch founder of Precious Plastic4, an organization that designed the machines now in use by the designers in Thailand and the Ukraine, and more than 200 others.

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“We want to make small-scale plastic recycling accessible to everyone.” [Photo: Precious Plastic]

One set of instructions explains how to build a low-cost machine that shreds plastic into flakes. Another modular machine extrudes plastic that can be used for 3D printing; an injection machine and a compression machine can form plastic into molds. A series of videos explain how to build the machines using basic materials and universal parts.

Designers around the world began using the machines to make recycled plastic products in 2016, and the organization is now sharing new instructions for building full recycling workshops inside shipping containers. They’ve also created a new map to connect people in the DIY recycling community.

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“This can have an exponential effect on the amount of plastic recycled–eventually reducing the demand for new virgin plastic.” [Photo: Precious Plastic]

“The map is intended to facilitate local collaboration among people to help the creation of hundreds more plastic recycling work spaces around the world as well as giving people a collaborative tool to fight plastic waste in creative ways–campaigning to pass laws, boycotting businesses, organizing protests, or any other form of action to end plastic pollution,” Hakkens says.

A new online marketplace called Bazar sells products made with the machines, in an attempt to help more people begin to make a living by recycling plastic.

While Hakkens says that the team is interested in building tools to recycle and use other materials, plastic is their priority. “Plastic is one of the most pressing issues facing the planet,” he says. “I think it will be our priority for many years to come.”

Puppy Gets Excited by Dancing

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I am a dancer.  I dance at home with my puppy, Amber.  It has happened more than once.  The first time I wasn’t paying attention because I was doing a video dancing.  Amber wanted to dance too.  I do have it on video and I think it is pretty funny.

Today I was dancing in my room and just getting into it and not paying attention to my puppy, Amber.  Previously she was just laying there.  As soon as I started doing some fast hip shimmy’s, she went insane.  She started jumping up and then I realized she could feel my vibration.

So dogs feel energy and people feel your energy too (more on that later).    It was just amazing to discover this and I just had to share my new discovery.


Also remember that people can feel your energy too.  So it’s best to just try to wish the best for every person you see.  But if you have low energy, it’s difficult to do that because you are not feeling the best.  You are most likely in survival mode.

Anyway dear ones if you have low energy and you want to feel better, the easiest quickest way is just to focus on gratitude.  It really works but it’s a habit like anything else.pexels-photo-424517.jpeg

Diet is also very important but people don’t know what to eat and what not to eat.  It’s very confusing.  But many people are just stuck on their diet treadmill and can’t see any other possibilities.  But you can change your diet.  Just make sure you are hydrated.  And remember there are many people that would love to help you.  You just have to reach out to them.

OK dear one’s, that’s it for now.  Have a blessed day and know that you are so loved.  More than you realize.  XOXO

Valerie is a Health and Wellness Coach.  She lives in Northern California with her daughter and puppy Amber.  You can learn more about Valerie here.

‘Plogging’ is the Swedish fitness craze for people who want to save the planet. It’s making its way to the U.S.

Originally Published on Washingtonpost.com on February 23, 2018 By Allison Klein

‘Plogging_ is the Swedish fitness craze for people who want to save the planet. It_s making its way to the U.S.
Have you recently spotted people toting trash bags while jogging? Or their hands filled with old plastic bottles? You might soon.

Across Europe, there are plogging groups in Scandinavia, Germany and beyond. In the United States, it’s just starting to catch on among exercisers who are fed up with rubbish along their route.

“I’m not going to just let litter sit there. I’m not going to just walk past that plastic bottle,” said plogger and Alexandria resident Emily Wright. “It’s not that I don’t think it’s gross to pick it up. I do. But I also think it’s gross for a person to not take responsibility for it.”

Wright, 40, has been plogging for several months along the Alexandria waterfront, but just a few weeks ago learned that what she’s been doing has a name.

Her partner used to lovingly tease her about her habit of going out for a run-walk for about an hour with a trash bag and plastic gloves.

“He used to call it my trash runs,” said Wright, a writer and cellist. “A few weeks ago he said, ‘the Swedes have a name for your trash runs!’”

‘Plogging_ is the Swedish fitness craze for people who want to save the planet. It_s making its way to the U.S._2

Emily Wright out on a plog in Alexandria, Va. (Courtesy of Emily Wright/)

She mostly picks up cigarette butts, bits of foam containers, plastic bottles and bottle caps. “There are an alarming number of full diapers,” she said. “They turn my stomach the most.”

Plogging not only helps the environment, it’s quite good for your health. Think squats while jogging.

According to the Swedish-based fitness app Lifesum, which earlier this month made it possible for users to track plogging activity, a half-hour of jogging plus picking up trash will burn 288 calories for the average person, compared with the 235 burned by jogging alone. A brisk walk will expend about 120.

“It makes me feel good for so many reasons,” Wright said. “My pants fit differently. I’m more nipped in at the waist. I think it’s because of balance and flexibility.”

Wright, 40, has been plogging for several months along the Alexandria waterfront, but just a few weeks ago learned that what she’s been doing has a name.

Her partner used to lovingly tease her about her habit of going out for a run-walk for about an hour with a trash bag and plastic gloves.

“He used to call it my trash runs,” said Wright, a writer and cellist. “A few weeks ago he said, ‘the Swedes have a name for your trash runs!’”

In Sweden, plogger Maja Tesch, 28, said she learned about plogging last year, when it became popular in the Scandinavian country. It spread through word-of-mouth, and the hashtag #plogging started popping up on social media. Tesch, a nurse, said she regularly organizes plogging events in which she and friends will pluck litter for a few hours, then spend time hanging outside together around a fire.

“I run a lot and I love to spend time in nature. When I find litter out in the woods or in the archipelago it makes me sad and a bit angry. When I heard about plogging it was a natural way to do something about that agitation,” Tesch said in an email. “It’s so easy to just bring the litter and put it in the nearest bin, and it makes you feel that you’re doing a difference!”

Laura Lindberg, who lives in Hoboken, N.J., said a few weeks ago she learned about plogging and had what she called an “aha moment.”

“It was a no-brainer. I knew I could incorporate it into my runs,” said Lindberg, 36, who runs four or five days a week. “I suddenly felt guilty for not doing it for all these years I’ve been running. All you need is a bag.”

She also takes along a pair of gardening gloves she stuffs into her pocket.

“I try to get in my first mile while I scope out where I see recyclables and garbage,” she said. On her second and third miles, she plucks litter off sidewalks and bushes.

“I’ve yet to look back,” said Lindberg, who works in sales for a health insurance company. “I’ve yet to return without a bag of recyclables and garbage.”

She said seeing litter on the street used to upset her.

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“I’d be frustrated by it,” she said. “Then it clicked, duh, I don’t have to be frustrated about it. I can do something about it.”

Lindberg said that while she thoroughly enjoys picking up trash in Hoboken, she wouldn’t attempt it where she works in New York City.

“With the pace on sidewalks, I’d be infuriating people if I started doing that here in Manhattan,” she said.

‘Plogging_ is the Swedish fitness craze for people who want to save the planet. It_s making its way to the U.S._3

In Sweden, some runners have taken up plogging, which is running while picking up trash. The fitness trend is starting to spread outside of the Scandinavian country. (YouTube/Run Fredrik Run!)

The environmental organization Keep America Beautiful recently started promoting plogging as a way to encourage trash-free communities. Spokesman Mike Rosen said when the group put out the #plogging message to its 600 affiliates, it got a surprising response.

“People started saying ‘we do things like this already,’” Rosen said. “In Tennessee they do an event called ‘Trashercize’ that combines exercising with cleaning up community.”

But he said for those people who love to jog, going for a plog in its place might not be realistic every time.

“I don’t think plogging replaces jogging as a daily activity,” Rosen said. “If you turn your jog into a plog once a week or once a month, or turn your walk into a palk or your hike into pike, you’ll get personal satisfaction. You’ll have an endorphin high from running, and you’ll know you’re helping your community.”