Marzipan Sauce

IMG_4132(1)

Recipes Originally Published on Organic Vegan Cuisine

Ingredients  

Almond Meal (Finely Ground Almonds) 50g

Almond Essence (Non-Alcohol Base) 70ml

Non-Sweetened Soya Milk 130ml

Firm Tofu 1/2 block (150gm)

Xanthan Gum 1/2 tsp

Water 300 ml

IMG_4134(1)

Directions:

Step 1: Bake Almond Meal & cashews at 220-250 C For about 6-10 Minutes.

Step 2: Put Soya Milk into the blender.

Step 3: Add the baked almond meal and cashews into the blender and blend for 1-2 minutes.

Step 4: Add the Brown sugar, salt, tofu, almond essence and vanilla. Blend for 1 minute or until mixed well.

Step 5: Near the end of blending add the coconut oil .

Step 6: Add the water and Xanthan gum and blend for 30 seconds until the texture is is consistent.

Step 7: Makes around 800 ml and keeps for around 2 weeks in refrigerator.

The Marzipan sauce is best stored in the refrigerator for 1 day to thicken before serving. Pour over cakes, cereal, , bread ice cream or puddings. Add to warm water for a refreshing drink. Serving size is usually 20-30ml.

For More information on Cooking Shows Visit: Suprememastertv.com

 

How to Make Soy Milk/Cómo hacer leche de soja

shallow focus photography of cafe late

Photo by Kevin Menajang on Pexels.com

Soy milk has a lot of information in the news regarding whether or not soy milk is healthy for you.  There’s research that says it’s good and bad.  However the bottom line is that you want to ensure that you are eating organic non Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) Soy Beans and then don’t eat it 3 times per day.  Only 1 serving per day is fine.  So maybe just a glass of soy milk or in your cereal is perfect.

3 cups of Soy Beans makes 1 gallon of soy milk.

  1. Soak 3 cups of dried organic soybeans in water overnight or for at least 8 hours
  2. Drain and carefully rinse the soybeans then add them to a grinder or blender and blend until smooth.  If using a blender add some water to aid blending
  3. Pour 1 gallon of drinking water into a large pot and add the blended liquid into it and stir for a few minutes.
  4. Strain the liquid through a muslin cloth and squeeze out the soya milk.  The pulp remaining in the cheesecloth is very nutritious also and can be used in bread making or soups.
  5. Bring the liquid to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer for at least 25 minutes.  Stir it with a wooden spoon to prevent burning.
  6. The soy milk can be enjoyed on its own, or with agave syrup, sugar or vanilla which can be added at this stage to flavor it.
  7. Serve warm or chill and enjoy.

NOTE: SOY milk may foam up quickly to the top of the pot.  If this happens, remove the pot from the heat or turn off the heat for a few moments until it cools a little and the foaming stops.

pexels-photo-133553

Photo by tyler hendy on Pexels.com

La leche de soya tiene mucha información en las noticias sobre si la leche de soya es saludable para usted o no. Hay investigaciones que dicen que es bueno y malo. Sin embargo, la conclusión es que usted quiere asegurarse de que está comiendo frijoles de soya orgánicos no modificados genéticamente (OMG) y luego no los coma 3 veces al día. Sólo 1 porción por día está bien. Así que tal vez solo un vaso de leche de soja o en tu cereal es perfecto.

3 tazas de frijoles de soya hacen 1 galón de leche de soya.

Remoje 3 tazas de soja orgánica seca en agua durante la noche o durante al menos 8 horas
Escurra y enjuague con cuidado las semillas de soja, luego agréguelas a un molinillo o licuadora y mezcle hasta que quede suave. Si usa una licuadora, agregue un poco de agua para ayudar a la mezcla
Vierta 1 galón de agua potable en una olla grande, agregue el líquido mezclado en ella y revuelva por unos minutos.
Colar el líquido a través de un paño de muselina y exprimir la leche de soja. La pulpa que queda en la estopilla también es muy nutritiva y se puede usar en la fabricación de pan o en sopas.
Hierva el líquido, luego baje el fuego y cocine a fuego lento durante al menos 25 minutos. Revuélvelo con una cuchara de madera para evitar que se queme.
La leche de soja se puede disfrutar sola o con jarabe de agave, azúcar o vainilla, que se pueden agregar en esta etapa para darle sabor.
Servir caliente o frío y disfrutar.
NOTA: la leche de SOJA puede formar espuma rápidamente en la parte superior de la olla. Si esto sucede, retire la olla del fuego o apáguelo por unos momentos hasta que se enfríe un poco y la espuma se detenga.

Making your own soy milk can be a great way to save $$, be Zero Waste and also ensure you aren't getting many of the preservatives that is put in commercial soy milk.  Good job if you do it!! But if you do 
not have time it's OK.  Just relax and eat something healthy.

tee peeValerie is a Health and wellness Coach. She is passionate about the planet and wants everyone to know that by making their own food, they can not only heal themselves but the whole planet. One person at a time that is. Share this Blog Post with your friends. Making your 
own food turns you into an Earth Angel so just know you're awesome no
matter what!!

22 Healthy Foods to Always Have in Your Fridge

Originally Published on ForksOverKnives.com on April 20, 2015 By Darshana Thacker

22 Healthy Foods to Always Have in Your Fridge_5
Here’s a master list to use when you’re stocking up on healthy ingredients and essentials. Filling your kitchen with healthy foods makes cooking delicious dishes a pleasure, not a chore. Although it looks like a long list, it’s worth it to stock up on condiments and frozen goods, since they will last for a long time.

1. Staple Vegetables

For vegetables, stock up on carrots, celery, beets, and bell peppers, because they have a better shelf life than other vegetables. You can use them in stews, for making stock, with dips as a snack, and in a lot of other types of recipes.

2. Staple Fruits

For fruit, stock up on apples, grapes, berries, and pears. These last a long time in your fridge, and are good for snacking or in oatmeal and baked goods.

3. Greens Like Lettuce, Spinach, and Kale

Fresh greens are always good for making a quick salad or for steaming or sautéing. You can also throw them in stews, soups, and healthy scrambles.

22 Healthy Foods to Always Have in Your Fridge_1

4. Fresh Herbs

Fresh herbs add flavor and freshness to almost any recipe you’ll make. My favorites are cilantro, parsley, thyme, sage, dill, and rosemary. If the herbs are damp, then wrap them in a dry paper towel before storing; if dry, wrap them in a damp paper towel before storing.

date paste recipe

5. Dates and Dried Fruit

It’s always a good idea to have dates and other dried fruits in your fridge. Keep your favorites on hand, whether they’re raisins, dried figs, dried apricots, currants, or cranberries. You will get a lot of use out of a small amount in place of sweeteners and in baking.

6. Nuts and Seeds

We use them sparingly at Forks Over Knives, but nuts are good to have in case you don’t have nut milk—you can quickly make some nut milk at home. You can also use nuts and seeds to garnish your salads or main dishes.

7. Plant-Based Milks

Stock up on any plant-based milk that you like, whether it’s almond, soy, rice, cashew, hemp, or rice milk. You can always use it in breakfast cereals, for making baked goods, and in any dish that requires a creamy texture. Just like with nuts and seeds, please use sparingly.

8. Salsa

Good quality store-bought salsa makes cooking easier, as you can use it in main dishes and as a dip or a dip ingredient.

9. Mustard

Always have some mustard you like in the fridge, whether it’s Dijon, yellow, spicy brown, or another variety. You can use it on sandwiches and in dressings and sauces.

10. Hummushomemade-hummus

Some good hummus is always useful to have in your kitchen, since you can use it as a dip or as a sandwich spread. Try this delicious low-fat hummus recipe.

11. Nutritional Yeast

Nutritional yeast adds a cheesy flavor to food, so it’s a good vegan ingredient to have on hand. You can use it in pasta, in dips, and in other savory dishes.

12. Miso Paste

Miso is a flavoring agent that’s great for cooking, and along with nutritional yeast, adds a good cheesy flavor to dishes.

13. Tahini or Peanut/Nut Butters

Tahini, peanut butter, and other nut butters are good for making sandwiches, dressings, and baked goods.

22 Healthy Foods to Always Have in Your Fridge_3

14. Tamari or Soy Sauce

Tamari or regular soy sauce is useful for making Asian dishes, for overall flavor, and in dressings.

15. Hot Sauce

I love hot sauce because it adds spice and kick to dishes. When you buy it at the store, try to find an oil-free brand with just a few ingredients.

16. Cacao Powder

Keep some cacao powder in your kitchen to make any dessert that requires chocolate.
For the Freezer…

17. Cooked Beans

Whenever you make a batch of beans, double the recipe so that you have extra to freeze. This cuts down a lot of prep time during the week.

To thaw: remove from the freezer and thaw in the fridge overnight, or run under hot water to use them immediately.

18. Cooked Grains

Just as with beans, grains freeze and reheat beautifully. Store extra cooked rice and quinoa in your fridge and quick meals will be a breeze.

To thaw: remove from the freezer and thaw in the fridge overnight, or steam them to use them immediately. Or place the frozen grains in a bowl, and set into a larger bowl partially filled with very hot water.

19. Frozen Vegetables

Stock up on frozen vegetables like corn, vegetable medleys, edamame, and green peas, and you will always have healthy options when you’re cooking.

20. Frozen Fruit

When your grocery store is having a sale, stock up on frozen bananas, frozen berries, and other frozen fruits. You can use them when baking, snacking, or in smoothies.

21. Garlic and Ginger

Garlic and ginger are excellent to have for flavoring savory dishes, so I store minced garlic and grated ginger in small freezer bags when I have extra. There’s no need to defrost it before using.

22. Corn, Rice, and Wheat Tortillas

These freeze well, and tortillas are endlessly useful when making tacos, wraps, quesadillas, and other handheld meals.

Ready to cook?

Check out our recipe database of delicious, gorgeous, and healthy dishes.

22 Healthy Foods to Always Have in Your Fridge_4

By Darshana Thacker

Darshana Thacker is chef and culinary project manager for Forks Over Knives. A graduate of the Natural Gourmet Institute, she’s known for her hearty and distinctly flavorful creations, which draw inspiration from a wide range of ethnic traditions. Chef Darshana was the recipe author of Forks Over Knives Family and a lead recipe contributor for the New York Times bestseller The Forks Over Knives Plan. Her recipes have been published in The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook, Forks Over Knives—The Cookbook, Forks Over Knives: The Plant-Based Way to Health, and LA Yoga magazine online. Chef Darshana has catered numerous events, served as a private chef and regularly holds individual and group cooking classes. Visit DarshanasKitchen.com for more.

The Heart Disease Rates of Meat-Eaters Versus Vegetarians & Vegans. The #1 Killer In The US

Originally Published on Collective-Evolution.com on June 23, 2017 By Arjun Walia

The Heart Disease Rates of Meat-Eaters Versus Vegetarians & Vegans. The #1 Killer In The US

Please be advised that there are multiple, heavily soured articles at the bottom of this one with a wealth of information about vegetarian/vegan diets. Please check them out if you’re interested and want to further your research.

Proper nutrition is essential for good health, and it’s disturbing how little doctors learn about it in medical school. As a result, they are unable to educate their patients on how to use nutrition to improve their health, or they offer advice based on science paid for by food corporations. The studies in this area are also not as strong as they could be, and that’s simply because they modern day medical industry is very invested in chemical medication.

The scientific literature these corporations use to indoctrinate us from an early age has been exposed as fraudulent, as countless studies have emerged showing the many problems with the modern day diet, which is the generally accepted diet. The problems with mass marketing and the manipulation of science require serious attention. After all, what exactly are we supposed to think when multiple editors-in-chief of peer-reviewed journals come out and blatantly say most of the research published these days is completely false? What are we supposed to think when new publications constantly offer a different narrative than the ones presented by major food corporations?

A recent FOIA investigation actually uncovered documents that show how the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) manipulates media and science press. This is hardly a surprise, as government agencies have long been involved with media manipulation, and several mainstream media journalists and news anchors have revealed this fact time and time again.

So, have we been completely misguided about nutrition and human nutritional requirements, which is why it’s so great to see more and more people becoming aware of this fact and taking their health into their own hands. It’s not a mystery why disease rates keep rising. While there are multiple factors at play here, the evidence points to mass meat consumption as a major one.

A Healthy Heart and How It Relates to Diet

“Studies are confirming the health benefits of meat-free eating. Nowadays, plant-based eating is recognized as not only nutritionally sufficient but also as a way to reduce the risk for many chronic illnesses.” (source)

From a scientific/biological perspective, the benefits of a meatless diet are inarguable. It makes one wonder why there is such a harsh resistance to this lifestyle. Skeptics will often point to the theory that we’ve been doing it this way for thousands of years, but that’s not true. Many experts in that field have repeatedly argued that our ancestral diets  were mostly plant-based, that meat was a ‘rare treat,’ and that our digestive systems aren’t really built for digesting meat on a daily basis.  Some of our ancestors had, as anthropologist Katherine Milton describes them, “different yet successful diets.” She says  some hunter-gatherer societies obtained almost all of their dietary energy from plants, and others obtained it from “wild animal fat and protein,” but that “does not imply that this is the ideal diet for modern humans, nor does it imply that modern humans have genetic adaptations to such diets.” (source)

Another heart surgeon who has done a lot for awareness, Dr. Ellsworth Wareham, explains:

The point is, it’s not all cut and dry like we’ve been made to believe.

There are many aspects to good health, and a vegan/vegetarian diet has proven to have benefits in several different areas. It’s particularly notable when we look at heart health. The number one cause for death in the United States, it is directly impacted by diet.

“Our standard American diet, also known as SAD, has put our country at the top of the list in the world for obesity, which increases the risk for serious health problems. Overwhelming scientific evidence links the consumption of meat and meat products to numerous diseases. . . . The World Health Organization (WHO) now places red and processed meat at the same danger level as cigarettes and asbestos. Meat is the new tobacco.”

– Dr. Joanne Kong (source)

Take a look at the graphic below regarding heart disease, the number one killer of Americans today. The risk of death from heart disease is significantly lower in vegetarians, and even lower in vegans.

Even the American Dietetic Association has weighed in with a position paper, concluding that “appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases.”

These diseases include heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and more.

There is a lot of science to back this up now, so much so that even the President of the American College of Cardiology, Dr. Kim A. Williams, has adopted a vegan diet. Talk about heart health…

He often sees patients who are overweight and struggling with hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and high cholesterol. One of the things he advises them to do specifically is to go vegan. He is also the Chairman of Cardiology at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. His enthusiasm for a planet-based diet comes from his interpretation of medical literature, having cited several studies proving that people who pursue vegetarian diets live longer than meat eaters and have lower rates of death from heart disease, diabetes, and kidney problems. (source)

It’s great to see more and more professionals realize this, as the science shows that a vegan/vegetarian diet can halt and even reverse multiple diseases.

Research carried out by Dr. Dean Ornish, who found that patients who were put on a program that included a vegetarian diet had less coronary plaque and fewer cardiac events, is also commonly cited.

And there’s plenty more where that came from.

The Heart Disease Rates of Meat-Eaters Versus Vegetarians & Vegans. The #1 Killer In The US_2

“Veganism is a very fine form of nutrition. It’s a little extreme to tell a person who is using flesh foods that you’re going to take everything entirely away from them. When I was in practice in medicine, I would tell the patients that the vegetable-based diet was the healthy way to go, and to keep away from the animal products as much as possible. People are very sensitive about what they eat. You can talk to people about exercising relaxation, good mental attitude and they will accept that. But you talk to them about what they are eating and people are very sensitive about that. If an individual is willing to listen, I will try to explain to them on a scientific basis of how I think it’s better for them.” (source)

This trend is inciting further scientific inquiry as its popularity grows. At least 542,000 people in Britain now follow a vegan diet — up from 150,000 in 2006 — and another 521,000 vegetarians hope to reduce their consumption of animal products. It is evident that veganism has become one of the fastest growing lifestyle choices.

One of the most comprehensive studies ever performed on this subject is “The China Study,” conducted by Drs. T. Colin Campbell and Thomas Campbell. Their findings showed direct correlations between nutrition and heart-disease, diabetes, and cancer, proving that cultures that eat primarily plant-based diets have lower to no instances of these diseases and that switching to a plant-based diet can successfully reverse diseases already established in the body.

The Common Criticisms of This Type of Lifestyle Change

“One of the saddest lessons of history is this: If we’ve been bamboozled long enough, we tend to reject any evidence of the bamboozle. We’re no longer interested in finding out the truth. The bamboozle has captured us. It’s simply too painful to acknowledge, even to ourselves, that we’ve been taken. Once you give a charlatan power over you, you almost never get it back.”

– Carl Sagan

The problem with many of the truths we hold as universal, not just about nutrition, but all aspects of our world, is that we’ve been bombarded with beliefs from biased sources for years and then accepted those believes as truth. And when someone believes something for a long enough time, if they encounter information that conflicts with that belief system, they do everything in their power to defend it. It’s called cognitive dissonance, and it’s why it can be extremely difficult to talk to a meat-eater about the benefits of veganism/vegetarianism.

The bottom line is, humans do not require meat, and a vegan/vegetarian diet, or a diet severely restricted in meat consumption, is a far healthier option.

This growing awareness is part of a shift in human consciousness that’s taking place on several different levels. Transparency is emerging within not only the food industry, but our health industry, the financial industry, our political systems, and more. We are finally learning that the truth truth regarding so many different topics has been skewed.

 

Miracle Substitue for Tortillas

tortillas

Well I just made the most amazing discovery.  As a Latina, I love tortillas.  Food For Life Sprouted Corn Tortillas or flour, I love them all.  So I have found Food For Life Brown Rice Tortillas to be very enjoyable as well.  There are also Alvarado Street Bakery Sprouted Grain Tortillas (They are also a highly ethical company as well) that are bomb digity.)  But when you realize that you have put on a few pounds and the reality sets in that refined carbs are not your friend.  It’s time to just give refined carbs a little break.

potatoes and beets

Sometimes I want what I want.  When a girl wants tortillas she wants tortillas.  So I was eating some potatoes, beets and some protein.  I wanted some tortillas but I didn’t want the carbs.  So I pulled out some big lettuce leaves and tore off a piece.  And proceeded to eat it the way I would do it with a tortilla.  OMG it was so delicious.  I did not feel deprived at all and I think I ate 3 or 4 whole red lettuce leaves.

lettuce

So I got my “tortilla” fix but not the unwanted carbs.  I was happy and satisfied.

So that’s my little story about how my substitute for tortillas.  Try it and let me know how you’re experience goes.

Valerie is a Health and Wellness Coach who lives in Northern California with her daughter and Black Labrador Retriever.  She’s on a mission to heal herself and the planet.  And remember, As you Heal Yourself, You Heal the Planet.  Relax, Enjoy your life and eat clean.  You can learn more about Valerie here.

 

Vegan Shiitake Wonton Soup

Originally Published on Connoisseurusveg.com on February 1, 2018 By Alissa

Vegan Shiitake Wonton Soup
This vegan wonton soup is made with savory shiitake stuffed wontons and crispy napa cabbage in a light gingery broth.

Disclaimer: I suck really bad at wrapping wontons, and you probably do too. Nothing personal…it’s just that, based on my experience wrapping wontons for this soup, I’ve determined that it’s something most people suck at. So there’s a high statistical probability you are one of those people.

I know what you’re thinking: the wontons in the photo look good enough. True. Those are the five wontons I spent most of an hour agonizing over. The rest, which were the majority of the wontons that we ate for dinner, were pretty hideous. If you want to find out just how unskilled you are at wonton wrapping, go wrap some up and put them in soup. Based on my prior wonton wrapping experiences (one and two), I thought I wasn’t half bad. Soup’s diffent though. Once they get into liquid they start inflating, unwrapping, tearing. It’s not pretty.

Having said all that, I’ll now tell you this: the ugly ones taste better. It’s true! It’s often the ugliest food that’s made with the most love and therefore tastes best.

So swallow your pride and serve your family some ugly wonton soup. They’ll love it, and they’ll love you, even if they make fun of you a little bit for your lack of dexterity.

I’m sure I’ll get some questions about vegan wonton wrappers because I always do. Both Twin Marquis and Dynasty make vegan wonton wrappers, and I’ve found both brands at reuglar supermarkets in the freezer. There’s usually a more popular brand that has eggs in the produce section near the tofu (why?), and that threw me off for a while. Then one day I looked in the freezer near the edamame, and lo and behold, vegan wonton wrappers. If you still can’t find them at the supermarket, try an Asian market. And you can always make your own. I’ve done it and it’s easier than you’d think!I’m always tempted to go for tofu in recipes like this, but this time I went with shiitake mushrooms, because they are, for lack of a better term, meaty. Dice them up nice and fine, add in some seasoning and you’ve got something that isn’t too far from the wonton soup you probably ordered from your favorite Chinese restaurant as a kid.

Vegan Shiitake Wonton Soup_2

Update, February 2018: I reshot the photos for this recipe and made a video. It looks like I improved a bit in the wonton wrapping department since originally posting this! Practice makes perfect!

 

Shiitake Wonton Soup

This vegan wonton soup is made with savory shiitake stuffed wontons, crispy napa cabbage and a light gingery broth.
Course Soup
Cuisine American, Chinese
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 4
Calories 317 kcal
Author Alissa
Ingredients

For the Wontons

4 ounces shiitake mushrooms
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon liquid smoke, optional
1 scallion finely chopped
16-20 vegan wonton wrappers

For the Wonton Soup

1/2 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1 garlic clove, minced
1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger
5 cups vegetable broth
2 cups shredded napa cabbage
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
Soy sauce or salt to taste
2 scallions, chopped

Instructions

Make the Wontons

Clean the shiitake mushrooms and remove the stems. Finely dice the caps and place them in a medium bowl. Stir in the garlic, ginger, soy sauce, sesame oil, liquid smoke, if using, and scallion.

Fill a small bowl with water. Arrange a wonton wrapper on work surface. Place about 1 teaspoon of filling in center. Dip fingers in water and moisten the edges of the wonton wrapper. Fold in half, over filling, diagonally, to create a triangle. Press the edges together to seal. Draw the side corners of the wrapper inward, join and press them together to seal, creating a loop. Repeat until all of the filling and wrappers are used.

Make the Wonton Soup

Coat the bottom of a large pot with the vegetable oil and sesame oil, and place it medium heat. Add the garlic and ginger. Sauté for 1 minute, until very fragrant. Add broth, raise the heat, and bring it to a boil. Add the wontons and lower the heat to a simmer. Allow the soup to simmer until all of the wontons float, about 5 minutes. Stir in the napa cabbage and vinegar. Remove from heat and season with soy sauce or salt to taste.

Ladle into bowls and top with scallions. Serve.

Recipe Notes

Make sure you read the ingredients on your wonton wrappers, as many brands contain egg.

Vegan Shiitake Wonton Soup_3

Meet Alissa

Welcome to Connoisseurus Veg!

I love creativity in the kitchen and veganizing everything I make.

Spring Potato Salad with Balsamic Vinaigrette {Vegan}

Originally Published on Vibrantplate.com on June 26, 2017 By Kristina

pring Potato Salad with Balsamic Vinaigrette Vegan

A simple vegan Spring Potato Salad with a delicious Balsamic Vinaigrette, the perfect use of new potatoes!

New potatoes must be one of the wonders of the world. We simply adore them! Soft and crispy, quickly baked and full of flavor, they are a legit main dish by themselves. It seems a sin to hide them in heavy sauces or with strong-flavored foods.

In late spring or early summer, when new potatoes are in season, we often eat them just plainly cooked with a side of salad, or – as in this case – in a salad, with a delicate balsamic vinaigrette.

pring Potato Salad with Balsamic Vinaigrette Vegan_2

This Spring Potato Salad with Balsamic Vinaigrette doesn’t really need a lot of work to put on the table and is a great lunch or side to a barbecue. Just cook potatoes, prepare salad and dress everything with a simple and delicious balsamic vinaigrette. Potatoes, lettuce, cucumber and some radishes with a touch of dressing and herbs. Done!

Spring Potato Salad with Balsamic Vinaigrette {Vegan}

Author: Kristina Jug
Yield: 1-2
Ingredients

  • 200 grams new potatoes
  • salt, pepper
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 2 cups of lettuce
  • 2 radishes
  • 1 small cucumber
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tbs balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tsp dijon mustard
  • 1 clove garlic
  • chives

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Instructions

1.Wash and dry new potatoes, then cut into smaller pieces, like pictured. Depending on the size of your potatoes, cut lengthwise and in half.
2.Heat a pan on medium and add 1 tbs of olive oil. Add new potatoes and season with a pinch of salt. Stir to coat the potatoes in oil and cook for about 20 minutes, stirring regularly, until the potatoes soften and turn golden-brown.
3.While the potatoes are cooking, wash, drain and cut lettuce. Wash, dry and thinly slice radishes and cucumber. Place lettuce, radishes and cucumber into a bowl.
4.Make balsamic vinaigrette: pour 1/4 cup of olive oil in a cup, add balsamic vinegar and dijon mustard. Add a finely diced clove of garlic and some finely chopped chives. Season with salt and pepper. Whisk well until thoroughly combined.
5.When the potatoes are cooked, remove from heat and let cool for a couple of minutes, then add to the salad. Pour balsamic vinaigrette over potatoes and salad and mix well. Serve.

Nutrition information (per serving):

Calories: 817.09 kcal
Fat: 68.32 g
Saturated fat: 9.49 g
Carbs: 48.68 g
Protein: 7.3 g
Fiber: 7.15 g
Sugar: 8.48 g
Sodium: 1403.43 mg
Trans fat: 0.0 g
Text and images copyright Vibrantplate.com © All rights reserved.

Best Ever Mushroom Soup

Originally published on BitesofWellness.com

Best Ever Mushroom SoupCreamy mushroom soup that is not full of crazy ingredients can be hard to come by. Trying to find a vegan version is pretty much impossible. Even if you do, it’s likely full of salt and preservatives. Well not anymore! This vegan mushroom soup is quite honestly the best mushroom soup I’ve ever had. Hands down, no contest.

I think letting the ingredients shine through can really makes the difference between “the best I’ve ever had” vs. “well that was good”, especially when you are talking soup. I have this wonderful memory of having lunch with a very good friend some 4 years ago and we both ordered the portabello mushroom soup. I laugh thinking back at the uncanny silence as we savored our lunch, since there was usually never any silence when were together, mostly because I never shut-up 🙂 But sometimes food can do that. Since then, I’ve been trying to recreate a soup that mimicked those flavors I still remember to this day.

Best Ever Mushroom Soup_2

The secret I’ve found is to remove cream from the equation. It somehow takes away from that mushroom flavor I’ve been chasing after in recreating that soup. The mushrooms, when you treat them right, take on this deep earthy flavor that can easily be lost if there are too many ingredients to compete with. Oh and thyme! I’m a firm believer that anytime you are making something with mushrooms, some fresh or dried thyme should be in the mix. Don’t believe me, well try this recipe and you will become a believer!!

This best ever mushroom soup for me is a flash back to the past, but I hope it becomes on of your favorites as well! The vegan soup can be made creamy with the addition of cashew cheese; my preferred addition. I usually have some at the house just waiting to be enjoyed, it’s been a wonderful addition. You could also add some parmesan cheese if you are not vegan, which would compliment the mushroom with its salty nutty flavor.

Since there are so few ingredients in this dish, I find that it’s important to use very good quality ingredients. Use fresh mushrooms, and organic veggie broth. To prepare the mushrooms, just use a dry paper towel to brush off any soil/dirt you see. Don’t run mushrooms under water, as they are very porous and will absorb the water, and never really develop their flavor fully.

I like using fresh thyme in this recipe, the aroma of the thyme is heavenly, and fresh herbs in the middle of winter are one of my favorite reminders that spring is coming. To remove the little thyme leaves from the stalk, simply hold the stalk at the very top (so the leaves are pointing up) and run your fingers down the stalk pulling the leaves down with your fingers. The stalks can be very fibrous and tough, so be sure to remove as much of them as you can.

Simple earthy mushrooms paired with fresh thyme come together to create the best mushroom soup I’ve ever had! Vegan and low fat, this soup will warm you from the inside out and will have you questioning ever having anything from a can again! This best ever mushroom soup also pairs well with your favorite version of grilled cheese for a hearty, filling meal!

This best ever mushroom soup is almost better the next day, so if you are having company, this would be a great make ahead meal. Just give the soup a few minutes to come back up to temperature over medium low heat before serving. Cashew cheese can be stirred in during the initial preparation or at this point. If you are adding any other kind of cheese, you will want to wait until serving to add it.

Best Ever Mushroom Soup

Best Ever Mushroom Soup_3
The best mushroom soup recipe I’ve ever had! Mushroom lovers rejoice, this soup is full of hearty, earthy mushrooms that don’t have to compete with other flavors to shine through. Vegan and fat free, this mushroom soup will quickly become a favorite in your home!

Course Soup
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 2
Calories 123 kcal
Author Bites of Wellness

Ingredients

1 large white onion diced
1 package white button mushrooms 10 oz sliced
1 package baby portobello mushrooms 10 oz sliced
10 stalks fresh thyme leaves removed
1 cup organic vegetable broth
1 tbs. tapioca flour
1 cup almond or cashew milk unsweetened
1 dried bay leaf
1/2 tbs. liquid aminos GF (or soy sauce)
1/2 tsp. salt
freshly ground pepper

Instructions

1. In a large saucepan, over medium heat, add the diced onions. Allow to sweat while slicing the mushrooms. About 5-7 minutes.
2. Move onions to the sides of the saucepan and add mushrooms, allow to cook 5 minutes uncovered.
3. Stir the onions and mushrooms together. Add fresh thyme and allow to continue to cook, at least 10 minutes.
4. You will notice a substantial amount of water has come out of the mushrooms, and they are reduced in volume by half.
5. Add the bay leaf, the salt and the liquid aminos to the mushrooms.
6. Stir the 1 tbs. of tapioca starch into the organic broth. Add to mushrooms and stir. Add almond milk.
7. Allow to cook for at least 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Taste and add freshly ground black pepper to taste.
8. This soup is amazing the next day as well and can easily be doubled.
9. Add cashew cheese, Parmesan cheese or enjoy the soup just as it is!

Simple Vegan Pesto

Originally published on Food52.com on March 29, 13 By Gena Hamshaw

Simple Vegan Pesto
Author Notes: This pesto is so good, you’ll never notice that it’s dairy-free! Nutritional yeast adds cheesy flavor. Serve this in sandwiches, with pasta, or as a topping for thickly sliced heirloom tomatoes. —Gena Hamshaw

Makes 1 generous cup

2 cups tightly packed fresh basil

1/2 cup walnuts or pine nuts

1 to 2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped (to taste)

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon lemon juice

3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

Simple Vegan Pesto_2

Place the basil, walnuts or pine nuts, and garlic in a food processor fitted with the S blade. Pulse to combine, until the mixture is coarsely ground.
Turn the motor on and drizzle the olive oil in a thin stream. Add the sea salt, pepper, lemon, and nutritional yeast, and pulse a few more times to combine.

This recipe is a Community Pick!